People — Students

Leor  Hackel

Bio

NYU Social Psychology Ph.D. Program

Leor is interested in how social motivations exert top-down influences on social, cognitive, and affective processes. In particular, he currently studies how self-representations and group motivations impact 1) mind perception, 2) valuation, and 3) emotion, using psychophysical methods, behavioral methods, and fMRI.

Email: leor.hackel@nyu.edu
Site:

Jennifer Henry

Bio

NYU Cognition & Perception Ph.D. Program

Jennifer hopes to use her PhD to alleviate the social problems that plague everyday people and their families because they fail to be conceptualized with attention to their underlying neural substrates. As a stepping stone to addiction, examining the motivational power of a stimulant like cocaine may help refine treatment methods currently in use for addicts. Her work seeks to bridge cellular and molecular neuroscience with behavioral and social psychology in hopes of helping prevent relapse and improving addiction treatment.

Email: jilh231@gmail.com
Site:

Amy Krosch

Bio

NYU Social Psychology Ph.D. Program

Amy examines how resource scarcity exacerbates racial inequalities, alters perceptions of fairness, and shifts the perceptual criterion used to determine group membership. Her long-term goal is to inform interventions aimed at reducing racial disparities in socio-economic and health outcomes.

Email: amy.krosch@nyu.edu
Site:

Hannah Nam

Bio

NYU Social Psychology Ph.D. Program

Hannah is interested in the psychological mechanisms and motivations that underlie both resistance to and support for change, especially under circumstances in which the status quo (social, economic, and political) is characterized by inequality and intergroup conflict. In addition, I am interested in understanding the neuro-cognitive correlates of political ideology, attitudes, and behaviors.

Email: hn442@nyu.edu
Site:

Candace Raio

Bio

NYU Cognition & Perception Ph.D. Program

Email: cmr385@nyu.edu
Site:

Ryan Stolier

Bio

Department of Psychology, New York University

Ryan is broadly interested in the architecture and dynamics of systems underlying person perception, and how they are instantiated neurally. To investigate this, his research primarily examines top-down influences on face perception, such as how motivations and prior knowledge impact social categorization from visual cues. His work applies both implicit behavioral and neural decoding methods to these questions.

Email: ryan.m.stolier@gmail.com
Site:

Jenny Xiao

Bio

NYU Social Psychology Ph.D. Program

Jenny is broadly interested in studying social categorization, social identity, stereotyping and prejudice. In her research, Jenny tries to understand intergroup relations and interactions by exploring how high-level social psychological constructs such as social identity can alter low-level cognitive and perceptual processes. Jenny’s primary line of research with Jay Van Bavel seeks to understand how our social identity and intergroup threat work in concert to shape our perceptual and representational experience of physical reality—particularly physical distance—which could in turn lead to detrimental consequences in intergroup relations and interactions.

Email: yx322@nyu.edu
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